US settles lawsuit alleging abuse of men detained after 9/11 | September 11 News

The Justice Division has settled a decades-old lawsuit filed by a gaggle of males who had been rounded up by the federal government within the weeks after the September 11, 2001 assaults and held in a federal jail in New York in circumstances the division’s personal watchdog known as abusive and harsh.

The settlement (PFD) introduced on Tuesday requires a $98,000 payout to be break up among the many six males who filed the swimsuit and had been held with out expenses on the Metropolitan Detention Heart (MDC) in Brooklyn, New York.

The boys – Ahmer Iqbal Abbasi, Anser Mehmood, Benamar Benatta, Ahmed Khalifa, Saeed Hammouda, and Purna Raj Bajracharya – mentioned they had been detained in restrictive circumstances and, in some circumstances, abused by members of the employees.

“Amongst different documented abuses, together with beatings, pressured sleep deprivation, and racial and spiritual slurs, lots of the victims had their faces smashed right into a wall the place guards had pinned a t-shirt with an image of an American flag and the phrases ‘These colours don’t run’,” the Heart for Constitutional Rights, a authorized organisation based mostly in New York Metropolis who represents the lads, mentioned in an announcement on Tuesday.

“The boys had been slammed in opposition to the t-shirt upon their entrance to MDC and instructed ‘welcome to America’,” in accordance with the assertion.

Mock detainee performance by artists in a New York City rally.
Efficiency artists collaborating within the “Rally Towards Battle, Racism & Islamophobia” in New York Metropolis [File: Chip East via Reuters]

The settlement closes a chapter on a troubling period in federal felony justice when Muslim, Arab and South Asian males had been rounded up within the days and weeks after the September 11 assaults.

Greater than 1,000 had been arrested in sweeps throughout the New York metropolitan space and nationwide. Most had been charged solely with overstaying visas and deported again to their dwelling international locations. However earlier than that occurred, many had been held in detention for months, with little exterior contact, particularly with their households.

They had been, in accordance with the 9/11 Fee report, arrested as “particular curiosity” detainees. Immigration hearings had been closed, detainee communication was restricted, and bond was denied till the detainees had been cleared of “terrorism” connections. Identities had been stored secret.

“I’m glad that the case is coming to an finish after 20 years of litigation. Nevertheless, it’s a bittersweet conclusion for me,” mentioned Benamar Benatta, one of many detainees and a plaintiff within the case, in accordance with the Heart for Constitutional Rights press launch.

“I don’t imagine justice is correctly served, contemplating the detrimental penalties the defendants’ actions have had on my life,” he mentioned.

“I can’t assist however really feel let down by the entire judicial system – federal courts had the chance to treatment the scenario however selected to not intervene, and, by doing so, they left the door open for future mistreatment and abuse to happen with none ramifications.”

US Justice department logo
The Justice Division didn’t admit guilt within the settlement, however every of the lads obtained a letter from the director of the Bureau of Prisons acknowledging they had been “held in excessively restrictive and unduly harsh circumstances” [File: Mark Lennihan/AP]

The settlement is considerably uncommon as a result of federal courts at almost each stage, together with the Supreme Courtroom, had thrown out massive chunks of the lawsuit. A federal district courtroom decide threw out the remaining a part of the swimsuit final 12 months. Although the plaintiffs filed an attraction, there had been little motion within the case for months.

Although the Justice Division doesn’t admit guilt as a part of the settlement settlement, Bureau of Prisons Director Michael Carvajal wrote a letter to every of the lads saying the Justice Division had decided they had been “held in excessively restrictive and unduly harsh circumstances of confinement and a lot of people had been bodily and verbally abused by sure MDC officers”.

The lawsuit initially sought accountability from high-level members of the George W Bush administration, and a settlement was reached in 2008 with the unique 5 plaintiffs. Others had been added.

“I don’t know that the director of the Bureau of Prisons has ever signed a letter of this nature earlier than to particular person shoppers, so that’s distinctive,” mentioned Rachel Meeropol, senior employees lawyer with the Heart for Constitutional Rights.

Meeropol known as the courtroom battle a failure of the justice system, pointing to the constraints on claims in opposition to federal officers.

The Justice Division didn’t instantly remark.

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